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HORSES

We have been breeding American Quarter Horses (AQHA) in a very small way for a number of years. We are interested in a category of horse known as a “using horse”. This is the traditional “do anything horse”.

We started with an older American Quarter Horse mare named Sisters Respect, born in 1986. She was an “Appendix” Quarter Horse because of her Thoroughbred blood. Genealogically, she came down from a Thoroughbred named Bold Ruler by Nasrullah. Bold Ruler sired Secretariat and the line that produced Seattle Slew. This bloodline was on Sisters Respect’s paternal side often referred to as the “top side”. On her mother’s side, she went back to a famous AQHA stallion named Top Moon.

We bred her to a stallion named Hesa Sonofa Dun who is a son of a well-known Quarter Horse named Hollywood Dun It. That union produced our gelding, Hollywoods Moon, (Woody) in July 2004. Until that time, she was a maiden.

We bred her to a stallion named Torreano whose bloodlines go back to Smart Little Lena and Nita Chex; that union produced our stallion, Torreanos Respect, (Mooney), in June 2007.

Sisters Respect is deceased and is buried in Pine Canyon, Tooele County, Utah.
She had two babies in her life, Woody and Mooney, 
we have them both.

We have been fortunate in having acquired a lovely mare, Keeche Don Quixote, (Keechie), who comes down on her topside from the world famous Thoroughbred, Three Bars, who, in some people’s opinion, was the greatest horse that ever lived. She goes back to Poco Bueno on her mother’s side. We are attempting a union between Keechie and Mooney, this being consistent with the goals our breeding program.

The goals of our breeding program, in order of importance, are:

EMOTIONAL STABILITY
This is more important than intelligence. Even with intelligence, if the horse is mentally unstable you don’t have a reliable partner.

INTELLIGENCE
Some horses seem exceptionally smart. Dumb people think horses are dumb.
Intelligent horse-people realize that horses process data differently than humans, but they are, never the less, not dumb. A smart horse can be a joy to work and play with.

GENERAL RESILIENCE
This includes resistance to accidents, and injury, as well as sickness, and disease. This is to say, a comprehensive toughness, and not prone to injury, which includes aspects of stable mentality. As a famous horseman said: Some horses can be put in a padded cell and still figure out some way to hurt themselves. Other horse-people say that the slightest change in their horse’s diet can cause physical distress such as colic. We need tough, smart horses that can take the unexpected, in stride.

ATHLETIC ABILITY
A well-known horseman pointed out a particular horse and said to me: Look how that horse is built. He shouldn’t be able to do anything, but you should see how well he can “run a reining pattern”. So, athletic ability is, athletic ability, irrespective of conformation.

CONFORMATION
This is how a horse is “put together”. It may suggest athleticism and/or potential capability. It is the main ingredient as to what a horse looks like. We like a horse that is big enough and heavy enough to handle a rider’s weight with a minimum of stress.

COLOR
Color is “frosting on the cake”. A pretty colored horse can be beautiful but, we never ever, ever, breed for color at the expense of any of the important attributes noted above.

*
We have a 27 year old gelding who is a grandson of well-known sprint horse, Boston Mac. Boston Mac also goes back to Three Bars. We are indebted to this horse and his fine character. Keeping him comfortable in his golden years is important to us.

We are very pleased with the temperament(s) of all our horses.

If we are accused of having Big, Tough, Sweet, Smart horses that are as “Fast As The Wind”, we can live with that.

We have no horses for sale at this time.

COMING SOON

* A ton of horse pictures *
Woody as newborn in Lehi.
July, 2004
Woody
                       Mooney, Cranking It Up!     
   MOONEY Age 1.
                        WOODY Age 3.
                         Turning it on!
               DESERT MIRAGE Age 26.
          KEECHE POCO QUIXOTE  Age 18.
 NEW BABY HORSE !   
Scroll down to the bottom.
Woody as a baby with his mom
in Lehi.
Woody in Erda. 3 years old?
Ditto
Mooney against a beautiful background.
About 1 year old.
Mooney as a youngster with his mom.
Mooney as a newborn.
Woody as a newborn.
Woody Ditto
Woody's Sire
Hesa Sonofa Dun 3181407
circa 2004
Jake Stephens is in the saddle.
Hesa Sonofa Dun  
X Hollywood Dun It
X Hollywood Jac 86
Ditto

in Lehi, Utah
Mooney's Sire
Torreano 4165985
April 2005
Lehi, Utah
Torreano
X Smart Chic Olena 2283074
X Smart Little Lena 1565822
Ditto
Good Grass in Spring Pasture.
Checking their condition.
Dezi is a Weiscamp Horse from the Maynard and Jackie Alves Ranch in Oregon.  Super sweet, gentle, and mild from the day he was born.
Sweetie is 28 as of 2013.
Hollie, AQHA 3609069, is expecting on May 27th, 2013. She goes back to Three Bars. The Dad goes back to Bold Ruler.
Pinky and Desi. Contented Horses.
This is Clyde, the killer horse. He ran as a mustang stallion on the central Nevada desert near Austin, for 8 years. You can see the Clydesdale blood in his appearance. The BLM has said he is a dangerous horse who will, "run right over the top of you!" He is intelligent, and kind, but very "light", sensitive, and "goosey".
A rather magnificent fellow.
    His ability to "multitask" is impressive. He can     think about a lot of things at the same time.
Sweet Desi. Never trained. He just lets people ride him.
The little mustang. A nice horse from the time he was a baby.
How sweet it is!
It's true, Hollie is expecting.
Waiting for May 27th.
Just born, sopping wet and shuddering.
Born May 28th, 2013         Approx. 1145 PM.
Two days old. Hollie's getting her girlish figure back.
NEW!
Horse Training Pictures 2016
below​
 Cynthia and Clyde. 

Double click here to add text.
Thor doesn't know that he hasn't been trained to do this.
Who's worried?
"Such a good boy."
Getting paid off.
Keeping those horses organized.
Starting into the obstacle course.
Morning in the pasture.
One of Torrey's Baby Teeth, found in his feeder.
Torrey as a young Stallion.
Being saddled for the first time.
No fussing, and walking on a loose lead.
WOODY.
Dezi.
Mooney.
Sally in the "Little Round Corral" with a young stallion called Torrey.
Body language. Torrey knows what Sally's saying.
Torrey's wearing a saddle blanket with a cinch and a bungee cord. This will get him used to the idea of a saddle. 
​Torrey needs to learn to stand still when tied.
Sally is waiting for Torrey to start pulling back.
"Sorry Sally, I ain't gonna pull back".
                       Oh, Okay.
Pinky and Torrey.
Nobody's worried.
Gentle training.
As of 2-18-'17. More to come.
Doug is looking for Saddle Trees that will be comfortable on a particular horse.
                                   No interference with scapula movement. 
                     Thor goes to the Dentist.
He's been given a sedative that puts him in LaLa Land. 
Taking off the outer cusps on the upper molars.
Inspecting Thor's mouth.
Smoothing the molars.
Dressing the cuspids and incisors.
Checking Thor's tongue for any scaring. 
Sally sits on Woody with no restraints.
              He doesn't care.
Using a modified wooden cane to teach horses to give us their feet.
Doug stops walking, Sally stops "riding".
Clyde understands and stands perfectly still.
Notice the loose lead and the loose reins.
Clyde isn't being forced to do anything.
Clyde gets used to the idea of following Doug around, so Doug unhooks the lead. Sally re-enforces the concept with
a loose, soft, cotton rope attached to a halter.
Clyde just wants to understand what's being asked.
Sally introduces Woody to the Obstacle  Course.
She gives him time to look things over.
Woody gets the idea that there is nothing to fear.
Does Woody care if Sally sits on him?
                         Nope.
Look at the Horse's eye.
He's really paying attention to Sally's body language.
Sally introduces young stallion, Torrey, to running water.
Nothing to be afraid of!
Hollie can be spooked quite easily.
We want to take that tendency out of her, by exposing her to everything we can think of. We want her to be as "bomb proof" as possible.
As you can see, she is coming along beautifully.
Hollie feels safe with Sally.
Sally is teaching Hollie how to back up in a straight line.
​Hollie is wearing a soft halter. She is learning through
communication, not force or pain.
Cynthia and Clyde.
Click on Thumbnails below.